Sunday, February 3, 2019

In Partnership With Mother Earth by Robert Koehler



In 2014 I shared an article by Robert Koehler titled "Calling All Pagans - Your Mother Earth Needs You" and wrote to the author in appreciation for his article.  I was surprised when he wrote back, and we had an exchange of ideas, and very pleased when he sent me a followup article in which he quoted me from our email conversation.  This was his followup article, and I felt like sharing it again.  




IN PARTNERSHIP WITH MOTHER EARTH

OK, mankind, it’s time to grow up, and I see a good way to start: Change the wording of Genesis 1:26. Change one word. 

Last week, I quoted that Bible verse in a column about the increasing velocity of climate change:   “And God said . . . let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air,” etc.  

Dominion!  Nature belongs to us, to suck dry and toss away. And thus we moved out of the circle of life and became its conquerors, an attitude at the core of the Agricultural Revolution and the rise of civilization. The momentum of this attitude is still driving us. We don’t know how to stop, even though most people now grasp that we’re wrecking the environmental commons that sustains life.

Addressing the verse and the idea of “dominion,” Phil Miller, a minister, wrote: “Some of us understand that word to mean ‘stewardship’ or ‘responsibility.’” And David Cameron wrote: “One has to wonder what would have ensued had the translation said ‘stewardship’ rather than ‘dominion’? Almost incomprehensible that our future and the future of so many and so much may have hinged on that one word.”

If in one of the most defining religious-political texts of the human species we’d been charged with stewardship of the natural world, not some sort of adolescent, consequence-free control over it, what sort of spiritual understanding would have evolved over the millennia? What sort of technology? What would our civilizations look like if we believed in the depths of our beings that they were not distinct from but part of nature? What if, instead of organizing ourselves around the concept that we have enemies to subdue — “survival of the fittest” — we explored the complexity of our connectedness to one another and the whole of creation, even when the connections were barely visible?

What I am coming to learn, as I ask such questions, is that this understanding is already vibrantly present in the collective human consciousness, drowned out as it may be by the special interests that run our world. These interests, which serve war and money, have belittled complex understanding as “paganism” and colonized, enslaved and slaughtered its primary keepers: the tribal and indigenous people of the world. 
Listen to the words of Rupert Ross, from his remarkable book Returning to the Teachings, as he describes his dawning understanding of the aboriginal culture of northern Ontario: 

 “The word ‘connecting’ leapt at me. It captured not only the dynamics I imagined in that room, but also the key feature of all the traditional teachings I had been exposed to thus far. Until then, I had somehow missed it. It involved a double obligation, requiring first that you learn to see all things as interconnected and second that you dedicate yourself to connecting yourself, in respectful and caring ways, to everything around you, at every instant, in every activity.“. . . (Children) had to learn to see themselves not as separate, individual beings but as active participants in webs of complex interdependencies with the animals, the plants, the earth and the waters.”

Indeed, Ross and many others have pointed out that indigenous science has always known what Western science has only recently relearned: that the universe is energy and dynamic flux, that there’s no such thing as objectivity and separation. 
“Like Western science, indigenous science relies upon direct observation for forecasting and generating predictions,” according to the Worldwide Indigenous Science Network. “. . . Unlike Western science, the data from indigenous science are not used to control the forces of nature; instead, tell us the ways and the means of accommodating nature.”   Among other critical distinctions, according to the website: “All of nature is considered to be intelligent and alive, thus an active research partner.”

 I note these ideas not to throw rocks around in some “debate” about who’s right, but to open up the national and global conversation about who we are. We can let these ideas sit in our imaginations. What might stewardship of nature mean if we regarded the relationship as a partnership? What might a celebration of Earth Day (April 22) look like?

“We need to re-myth culture, to re-sanctify nature before it’s too late,” Lauren Raine (“a longtime advocate and practitioner of neo-pagan theology and resident artist for Cherry Hill Seminary, “the only accredited Pagan seminary in the U.S”) wrote to me last week.“Earth-based spirituality is to be found in all cultures, including many rich traditions from Europe and Great Britain. The evolution of our strange, life-denying religious backdrop has much to do with the evolution of patriarchal culture and values. We need to get rid of the war gods, and return . . . to honoring the Mother.

We also need to put our lives on the line, or at least honor those who do. One of the many responses I got to last week’s column was from environmental activist Jessica Clark, who faces jail time for sitting in a tree last fall.  
In September, she and other members of the Michiana Coalition Against Tar Sands, or MICATS, temporarily blocked Enbridge Inc.’s tar sands pipeline expansion through Michigan. This was an expansion of the same pipeline that ruptured in 2010, badly polluting the Kalamazoo River; it was the largest and costliest inland oil spill in history. 

One night the protesters climbed trees at the construction site in central Michigan and anchored their platform to the company’s construction equipment. If the ropes had been moved, the protesters’ platform would have tipped, dropping them 50 feet to the ground. That didn’t happen, but they were arrested and convicted of trespassing — for the crime of stewardship. It’s the price of growing up.



 Robert Koehler is an award-winning, Chicago-based journalist and nationally syndicated writer. His book, Courage Grows Strong at the Wound (Xenos Press), is still available.
Contact him at koehlercw@gmail.com or visit his website at www.commonwonders.com.

Saturday, January 26, 2019

Earth Speak: Envisioning a Conversant World


https://www.slideshare.net/laurenraine/earth-speak-2019-presentation



Earth Speak 2019 presentation from Lauren Raine



Earth-speak:
Envisioning a Conversant World

By Lauren Raine MFA

"Speak to the Earth and it shall teach thee"
Job 12:8

This fall I attended  a  conference on  sacred sites and dowsing in the UK, and  continued my visit as a personal pilgrimage, visiting  Avebury, Glastonbury, Arbor Low, and other sites.
 After a 15 hour flight from LA, I waited in line 2 hours in Customs, then  made my way  to Paddington Station in London, then to Swindon by train, finally to Avebury by bus, and wholly  exhausted  stepped from the bus to see, perfectly aligned with my sight,  rising from the mist,   the great prehistoric monument  of Silbury Hill, the mysterious  Omphalos of an ancient  world.  

When I saw Silbury through the mist, what opened before me was a vision of a time when the entire landscape was the  sacred body of  the deity,  a cyclical mythos  of an animated Earth that ensouled and enlivened and enstoried every hill, spring, river and forest within a cosmology of conversant belonging.

Situated just south of Avebury, Silbury Hill is Europe's tallest prehistoric structure.   Michael Dames, in his book THE SILBURY TREASURE,  demonstrates that Silbury, like other "neolithic Harvest Hills" associated with nearby henges and standing stones,  literally represented the pregnant belly of the  Great Mother, and was associated with a certain time of the year, in particular, the harvest of July/August.  

Silbury Hill is part of the Avebury complex, and  has been excavated over the centuries, never once  finding the “great chieftain’s treasure” which it was assumed “must” be there.  We now know that its  interior holds grains, turf, and animal bones, with no evidence of human burial at its core.  Silbury was  surrounded by a henge or moat of water, which Dames points out actually forms the shape of a squatting or birthing  woman in profile.     He likens the "Goddess form" of the henge  to similar ubiquitous Goddess sculptures and sites associated with  Cornwall, Ireland, Scotland, the Orkney Islands, the Hebrides, the Isle of Man, Brittany.........as far as the mysterious Temples of Malta,  or the barely excavated stone circles of Gobekli Tepe in Turkey.

 Why has this interpretation of Silbury never been seen before?  Because, Dames points out, to do so one must make a paradigm shift.  “Silbury “ he writes,

“conveys a philosophy which is of exceptional relevance to the modern world.  Silbury has been reduced to an enigma because of the  attempt to impress upon it concepts such as kingship, personal property, and individual male glory. Who put “King Sil” into Silbury?  We did, because we wanted him there - a superman chieftain with a super treasure and hundreds of slaves,  so vain, so aggressive, so acquisitive, so preoccupied with eternal fame, that he could provide us with a monumental tomb and treasure.  All treasure finding  attempts have failed because the builders belonged to a society for which such concepts had little importance, or even meaning.  And yet, since their compelling priorities are not entirely absent from our values, we can appreciate something of what the original Silsbury treasure was, especially since the future of our own civilization may give us urgency and humility to tender our investigation.”

When I later walked  the Avebury complex I experienced  the  intensification of  life force vitality I have come to recognize  in  places of numinosity and  telleric force.  There is no doubt in my mind (or body mind) that these  sites marked places of intrinsic geomantic power, and the placement of stones also served to intensify or channel the  animating  Earth energies  present.   Sacred landscapes  also augment their healing or consciousness elevating properties  through the  interaction  of generations of  people with the "spirit of the land"  through geomantic reciprocity.

 Geomantic reciprocity occurs  as human beings bring intentionality and focus to a particular place.  The communion with place  becomes more active as place itself  accrues story,  in the memory of the people, and in the memory of the land.   Sacred places have both an innate and a developed capacity to bring about altered states of consciousness, especially if people come with the open liminal state of pilgrimage or ceremony.  And myth   is the language spoken, if we wish to engage the numinous presence.

I also went to Glastonbury, to visit the Chalice Well.  Glastonbury  is  the  source of the Arthurian legends,  of Merlin and the Lady of the Lake.  Once the hill called the  Tor was actually surrounded by a lake.  During the Middle Ages it contained the great Gothic  Cathedral of Glastonbury.  Dowsers speak of the “crossing of the Michael and Mary  lines” at the Tor, as well as the more mutable “Dragon lines” of serpentine force .   Now called the "Red Spring" and the "White Spring", the source of the Chalice Well is still revered  by pilgrims.   The red color is iron oxide being deposited by the springs - the white spring deposits calcium, leaving a white tinge as it passes over.  The Avalonian springs are famous………….but in truth, there are hundreds of once revered historical wells and springs throughout the UK, many of them still named for St. Brigit, the ancient Goddess of the Isles of Britannia. 

The Chalice Garden is  infused with  presence, with what locals call  the  Lady of Avalon.  I  took water to bring home, and walked around.  What popped into my mind  was odd - the words "Covenant Garden". 

 What could "covenant garden" mean, and why had I thought of it?  I remembered the  name of the English Goddess,  Coventina, from which the word itself may be related.  Later I considered that the word Covenant, like "coven", "convening" etc.  refers to a gathering of people to reach an harmonious agreement, which can include an agreement that is holy  in some way.    Such as the famous "Ark of the Covenant", which was supposed to hold writings and objects of veneration, as well as "God's sustenance for man" which was called Manna.   Manna was the food, variously described as different substances, that was provided to feed the people; it has also come to be used to mean a kind of numinous power. 

 According to Wikipedia, the Ark of the Covenant  is a gold-covered wooden chest  described in the Book of Exodus as containing the stone tablets of the Ten Commandments.  It also is supposed to contain “a golden jar holding manna, and Aaron's rod, which budded" .
Interesting:  holy food and a budding rod or tree.  The Garden is indeed a "harmonious agreement" between earthly beings.  And "Manna" is the food provided by the Garden, which I view as the sustaining power of  nature.  Aaron’s  "rod that blooms".............could also be seen as the ancient Hebrew and Middle Eastern  Goddess Asherah, who was often  represented as a tree, and  in the days of the old testament She was represented as a rod,  or "Asherah pole".  The practice of carrying "Asherah poles" was apparently fairly common in the early days of the Semite tribes, although the Patriarchs later eliminated this custom, along with the Goddess, as the Hebrew deity became exclusively male.  

I reflected that a Garden represents a "Covenant"  between human, animal, plant, soil, air, rain, water.......A successful garden is a harmonious Ecosystem.  A garden thrives through a network of inter-dependant relationships.  Trees communicate  with each other through a vast underground weaving of roots and fungi.  The bees and other pollinators bring new life; the worms, microorganisms and  and other insects  assist in the decay process.  And the birds  assist in distributing seed as well.  Not to mention humans that may plant, sow, admire, and occasionally eat the stray apple or strawberry as well.  It could be said that a Garden is a "Covenant" achieved by many beings, a divine agreement.  THE GARDEN OF THE COVENANT.

As I was leaving my Pilgrimage,  I saw a tiny metallic heart on the ground.  I was going to take it, but then it occured to me that  perhaps someone left it as a kind of offering, and it wasn't right for me to take it.  I put it back on the ground and took a picture.  I was amazed to see this light surrounding it in the photo!  So I took two more - they came out the same!  
 A Green Heart ………  Perhaps the Earth is Speaking to us  all the time, we’ve just forgotten how to listen.

"To the native Irish, the literal representation of the country was less important than its poetic dimension.  In traditional bardic culture,  every place had its legend and its own identity....what endured was an ongoing conversation with the mythic landscape."
R. F. Foster

In so many  areas of the UK  the 21st Century can seem like  just another layer atop a  pentimento  of  a much older landscape.   Of course this is true everywhere, but it seems so much in evidence there.  That "pentimento" is  circular, serpentine, full of  standing  stones, henges, magic wells. and ley lines.   What, as  theologians and  "geologians" for the future,  might we re-cover and  re-invent from it?

With the evolution of monotheism and patriarchal  religions that increasingly removed divinity from Nature and the body, and in the past century, the rise of industrialization, we have looked at the world  from a "users" point of view.  Renunciate  religions have de-sacralized earthly experience, further complicating our crisis.   Yet every early culture  has insisted that nature is full of intelligence.    Contemporary Gaia Theory proposes that the Earth is a living, self-regulating organism, responsive and evolving.  If one is sympathetic to Gaia Theory, and the innate intelligence of ecosystems,  it follows that everything living  is responsive and conversant in some way, visible and invisible.

We need to learn to "speak with the Earth" again, not in some  abstract way, but intimately, beneath our well-rooted feet, in our creative hands entwined and webbed among a  great planetary collaboration. The  "Covenant" of the Garden.   
How do we regain our  niche in that  great “Covenant”?   I believe  one answer  is  “re-mything” .  Myth is, and always has been, a way for human beings to become intimate and conversant with what is vast, deep, and mysterious. Our experience changes when Place becomes "you" or "Thou" instead of "it".    As Pagans  we are uniquely able to address that question.  In the past, "Nature" was  a relationship with Deity, a relationship  within which cultures, individuals and religions  were profoundly embedded as story and living metaphor.  Cooperation and respect  was essential for well-being.  
And some places were places of special power, places of pilgrimage. 

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

15th Annual Conference on Current Pagan Studies in Claremont, CA


This weekend (January 26 and 27, 2019) I will be at the Conference on Pagan Studies at Claremont Colleges, in Claremont, California. It's the 15th year for the Conference, and as always, I look greatly forward to it! I'll be sharing a paper called "Earth Speak: Envisioning a Conversant World". The Conference is friendly, fascinating, and affordable - if you're in the area, come join us!

Picture

Sunday, January 20, 2019

Remembering Mary Oliver


I was so saddened to learn of the death of poet Mary Oliver, who, like Ursula Leguin, has been a lifelong mentor and inspiration.  I felt like sharing again this poem of hers, which says something about her to me.  Because she was, indeed, a Light to the world.

The Buddha’s Last Instruction


“Make of yourself a light,” 
said the Buddha,
before he died.

I think of this every morning
as the east begins
to tear off its many clouds
of darkness, to send up the first
signal – a white fan
streaked with pink and violet,
even green.

An old man, he lay down
between two sala trees,
and he might have said anything,
knowing it was his final hour.

The light burns upward,
it thickens and settles over the fields.
Around him, the villagers gathered
and stretched forward to listen.
Even before the sun itself
hangs, disattached, in the blue air,
I am touched everywhere
by its ocean of yellow waves.

No doubt he thought of everything
that had happened in his difficult life.

And then I feel the sun itself
as it blazes over the hills,
like a million flowers on fire –
clearly I’m not needed,
yet I feel myself turning
into something
of inexplicable value.

Slowly, beneath the branches,
he raised his head.
He looked into the faces of that frightened crowd.

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Exhibit at Clay Co-op January 11th


I'm very pleased to have a chance to share some of the work I did this past summer, collectively called "Our Lady of the Shards".    I will also be reading from "Aphrodite in Brooklyn and Other Mythic Voices", my recent collection of poetry.  Welcome all who happen to be in the Tucson Area!  

​"Our Lady" lies among the broken shards, debris  and resurfacing mythos of the past.  She has been buried by time, history,  war, and  often the co-option of what was once sacred.  She is the Black Madonna:  the dark, generative Mother  Earth found in the presence of sacred springs and cave, or like Our Lady of the Desert Spring, She is  the numinous Spirit of Place.  And She is also the forgotten, yet life sustaining  work of those unknown women who wove the ancient stories, who birthed our ancestors, the memory keepers and the comforters,  arising into the world again,  insisting that we  remember and reclaim.







Monday, December 31, 2018

The Encyclopedia of Women in World Religions


I want to announce a truly monumental work, the Encyclopedia of Women in World Religions, published recently  this year by ABC-Clio Publishersand edited by Susan de-Gaia Ph.d.  So many important Voices speak to the Re-Emergence of the Divine Feminine in our world.  It was my privilege to have a small inclusion in the Encyclopedia as well.  There is a hard copy and an EBook as well.  Congratulations to all who participated in this important project, and most especially to Susan de-Gaia for her monumental dedication 
in creating it.
Encyclopedia of Women in World Religions: 
Faith and Culture Across History

 Susan de-Gaia, Editor




Author-Subject List (PARTIAL ONLY)





Headword
Author Category
Contributors
Priestesses and Oracular Women
AFRICAN RELIGIONS
Dashu, Max;
Yoruba Religion
AFRICAN RELIGIONS
Finley, Mackenzie;
Body Art
AFRICAN RELIGIONS
Hahn, Allison;
Life Cycle Ceremonies
AFRICAN RELIGIONS
Hahn, Allison;
Rastafari
AFRICAN RELIGIONS
Hahn, Allison;
Candomble
AFRICAN RELIGIONS
Oleszkiewicz, Malgorzata;
African Religions in Diaspora
AFRICAN RELIGIONS
Razak, Arisika;
Art in Africa
AFRICAN RELIGIONS
Razak, Arisika;
Female Genital Mutilation
AFRICAN RELIGIONS
Team, Victoria;
Sibyls
Ancient Religions
Atkinson, Kenneth;
Diana
Ancient Religions
Bonar, Chance;
Homosexuality
Ancient Religions
Bonar, Chance;
Sappho
Ancient Religions
Christ, Carol;
Shamans in East Asia
Ancient Religions
Dashu, Max;
Hypatia
Ancient Religions
Dr. Vivianne Crowley Ph.D.: SW1
Inanna
Ancient Religions
Foust, Kristan: UTA;
Athena
Ancient Religions
Foust, Kristan;
Daily Lives of Women-Greek Roman
Ancient Religions
Foust, Kristan;
Egyptian Religion
Ancient Religions
Foust, Kristan;
Marriage, Ancient Greek and Roman Religions
Ancient Religions
Foust, Kristan;
Pre-Greek Goddesses in the Greek Pantheon
Ancient Religions
Haarmann, Harald: Inst of Archa
Priestesses and Their Staff in Ancient Greece
Ancient Religions
Haarmann, Harald: Inst of Archa
Sun Goddess
Ancient Religions
Haarmann, Harald: Inst of Archa
Delphic Oracle
Ancient Religions
Kerley, Gary;
Gorgon Medusa
Ancient Religions
Marler, Joan;
Eleusinian Mysteries, Greek and Roman Religio
Ancient Religions
Shipley, Morgan;
Gaea
Ancient Religions
Shipley, Morgan;
Mesopotamian Religion
Ancient Religions
Therese Rodin;
Ninhursaga
Ancient Religions
Therese Rodin;
Writers and Poets, Ancient Mesopotamian
Ancient Religions
Therese Rodin;
Religious Leadership, Ancient Roman Religions
Ancient Religions
Webb, Lewis;
Baha'i_Education
BAHA'I
Crosson, Selena;
Gender Roles
BAHA'I
Eschevarria, Lynn;
Divine Feminine
BAHA'I
Maneck, Susan: 39212;
Tahirih
BAHA'I
Maneck, Susan: 39212;
Women in Baha'i Scriptures
BAHA'I
Maneck, Susan: 39212;
Nuns, Theravada
BUDDHISM
Amore, Roy C.: University of Win
Therigatha
BUDDHISM
Amore, Roy C.: University of Win
Women in Early Buddhism
BUDDHISM
Amore, Roy C.: University of Win
Abortion
BUDDHISM
Bechtold, Brigitte;
Bodhisattvas
BUDDHISM
Bechtold, Brigitte;
Engaged Buddhism
BUDDHISM
Bechtold, Brigitte;
Gender Roles
BUDDHISM
Bechtold, Brigitte;
Ordination
BUDDHISM
Bechtold, Brigitte;
Nichiren
BUDDHISM
Cavaliere, Paola;

Zen BUDDHISM

Dance of Tara BUDDHISM

Feminine Virtues BUDDHISM

Lay Women in Theravada Buddhism BUDDHISM

Buddhism in America BUDDHISM

Pajapati BUDDHISM

Sacred Texts on Women BUDDHISM

Tea Ceremony BUDDHISM

Mahayana BUDDHISM

Women's Buddhist Networks BUDDHISM

Soka Gakkai BUDDHISM

Guan Yin BUDDHISM

Funeral Practices BUDDHISM

Dance BUDDHISM

Female Divinities BUDDHISM

Prajnaparamita BUDDHISM

Tara BUDDHISM

Tantra BUDDHISM

Julian of Norwich CHRISTIANITY

Chastity CHRISTIANITY

Monastic Life CHRISTIANITY

Christianity in America CHRISTIANITY

African American Women CHRISTIANITY

Christianity in Latin America CHRISTIANITY

Abortion CHRISTIANITY

Clothing CHRISTIANITY

Mormonism CHRISTIANITY

Homosexuality in Early to Early Modern Christia CHRISTIANITY

Mother of God CHRISTIANITY

Women in Early Christianity (1 to 300) CHRISTIANITY

Abbesses CHRISTIANITY

Education CHRISTIANITY

Pilgrimage CHRISTIANITY

Women in the Reformation CHRISTIANITY

Mary Magdalene CHRISTIANITY

Mystics CHRISTIANITY

Hildegard of Bingen CHRISTIANITY

Relationship and Social Models in Scripture CHRISTIANITY

and Archaeology

Sophia CHRISTIANITY

Missionaries CHRISTIANITY

Charity CHRISTIANITY

Medieval Women Monastics CHRISTIANITY

Roman Catholic Women Religious CHRISTIANITY

Polygamy CHRISTIANITY

Christianity in Africa CHRISTIANITY

Interfaith Dialogue, Post 9/11 CHRISTIANITY
Cavaliere, Paola;

de Gaia, Susan; Moses, Phyllis; Engelmajer, Pascale; Engelmajer, Pascale;

Foulks, Beverly;

Lee, Kenneth;

Lee, Kenneth;

Lee, Kenneth;

Lehrer, Tyler;

Lehrer, Tyler;

Morris, James;

Ms. Emily B. Simpson; Remoiville, Julie; Shaw, Miranda; Shaw, Miranda; Shaw, Miranda; Shaw, Miranda;

Shaw, Miranda; Lee, Kenneth: C Allen, Amanda;

Amanda Haste;

Amanda Haste;

Auguste, Nicol;

Bailey, Emily; Bartel, Rebecca; Bechtold, Brigitte; Bohleke, Karin;

Burns, William Earl (aka - Burns, Carroll, Charles;

Clark, Patricia;

Coltri, Marzia;

Crown, Nick;

Crown, Nick;

Crown, Nick; Darlage, Adam; de Gaia, Susan;

de Gaia, Susan; Haste, Amanda; Dr. Vivianne Crowley Ph.D.: SW1 Eisler, Riane;

Evans, Kathryn;

Gabryszewska, Maria;

Ganim, Carole;

Ganim, Carole;

Ganim, Carole;

Gullota, Daniel;

Hahn, Allison;

Haney, Marsha;

Anglican/Episcopalian Women Religious
CHRISTIANITY
Haste, Amanda;
Contemporary Women's Monasticism
CHRISTIANITY
Haste, Amanda;
Marriage, Divorce, Widowhood
CHRISTIANITY
Haste, Amanda;
Christianity in Europe
CHRISTIANITY
Magyar, Judit;
Orthodox Christianity
CHRISTIANITY
Magyar, Judit;
Christine de Pizan
CHRISTIANITY
McNary-Zak, Bernadette: Rhode
Stigmatics
CHRISTIANITY
Painter, Cassandra;
Apocrypha
CHRISTIANITY
Peek, Stephanie;
Art, Modern and Contemporary
CHRISTIANITY
Sachs, Hannah;
Fundamentalism
CHRISTIANITY
Sanders, Mary;
Ministers
CHRISTIANITY
Sanders, Mary;
Protestant Denominations
CHRISTIANITY
Sanders, Mary;
Fall, The
CHRISTIANITY
Shipley, Morgan;
Founders
CHRISTIANITY
Voorhees, Amy;
Middle Ages
CHRISTIANITY
Walter, Katherine: College at Bro
Saints
CHRISTIANITY
Walter, Katherine: College at Bro
Women Writers in Early and Medieval Christian CHRISTIANITY
Walter, Katherine: College at Bro
Sex and Gender
CHRISTIANITY
Walter, Katherine;
Widowhood
CHRISTIANITY
Walter, Katherine;
Cult of Female Chastity
CONFUCIANISM
Campbell, Josianne;
Feminine Virtues
CONFUCIANISM
Campbell, Josianne;
Classical Confucianism
CONFUCIANISM
Danner, Lukas;
Books for Women
CONFUCIANISM
de Gaia, Susan;
Filial Piety
CONFUCIANISM
Du, Yue;
Confucian Revivalism
CONFUCIANISM
McClenon, Julia: UCSB;
Motherhood
CONFUCIANISM
Remoiville, Julie;
Women's Changing Roles
CONFUCIANISM
Remoiville, Julie;
Healers
DAOISM
McClenon, Julia: UCSB;
Wu Wei
DAOISM
McClenon, Julia: UCSB;
Goddesses
DAOISM
Perreira, Todd;
Priestesses, Nuns, and Ordination
DAOISM
Perreira, Todd;
Daoism in China
DAOISM
Zhu, Liang;
Draupadi
HINDUISM
Agarwal, Komal;
Vedic Hinduism
HINDUISM
Agarwal, Komal;
Festivals
HINDUISM
Amazzone, Laura;
Pilgrimage
HINDUISM
Amazzone, Laura;
Shakti
HINDUISM
Amazzone, Laura;
Yoginis
HINDUISM
Amazzone, Laura;
Gurus and Saints
HINDUISM
Bhattacharyya, Monoloina;
Aditi
HINDUISM
Campbell, Josianne;
Caste
HINDUISM
Dandekar, Deepra: 12207;
Devadasis
HINDUISM
Dandekar, Deepra;
Household Shrines
HINDUISM
Dandekar, Deepra;
Ideals of Womanhood
HINDUISM
Dandekar, Deepra;
Durga and Kali
HINDUISM
Evans, Kathryn;
Fundamentalism
HINDUISM
Goulet, Nicole;
Renunciation
HINDUISM
Goulet, Nicole;

Devi
HINDUISM
Goulet, T. Nicole: Indiana Univer
Saraswati
HINDUISM
Goulet, T. Nicole: Indiana Univer
Sati
HINDUISM
John Capucci;
Tantra
HINDUISM
Kumar, Pawan;
Lakshmi
HINDUISM
Mitra, Semontee;
Marriage
HINDUISM
Mitra, Semontee;
Prakriti
HINDUISM
Mitra, Semontee;
Sacred Texts on Women
HINDUISM
Mitra, Semontee;
Radha and Gopi Girls
HINDUISM
MoChridhe, Race;
Dance
HINDUISM
Parveen, Rasheda;
Stage of Life Rituals
HINDUISM
Pillai, Rupa;
Matriliny
HINDUISM
Rath, Akshaya: National Inst of T
Bhakti
HINDUISM
Rath, Akshaya;
Arts (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Anton, Beata;
Ceremonies (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Anton, Beata;
Clothing (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Anton, Beata;
Marriage and Social Status (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Anton, Beata;
Sacred Spirits (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Anton, Beata;
Women Warriors (Native American
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Dry, David;
Ancestors (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Evans, Kathryn;
Creation Stories (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Evans, Kathryn;
Nature (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Evans, Kathryn;
Sacred Place (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Evans, Kathryn;
Shamanism in Eurasian cultures
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Haarmann, Harald: Inst of Archa
Shamans in Korea
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Kendall, Laurel: American Museu
Matriarchies
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Mann, Barbara: University of Tol
Activism (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Shipley, Morgan;
Medicine Women (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Shipley, Morgan;
Kinship (Native American)
INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS
Stover, Dale;
Islam in Africa
ISLAM
Acquah, Lady Jane: ljane26@gm
Hawwa
ISLAM
Agha-Jaffar, Tamara;
Maryam
ISLAM
Agha-Jaffar, Tamara;
Islam in America
ISLAM
Brandon, Alexandra;
Peacemaking
ISLAM
Fitriyah, Lailatul;
Honor
ISLAM
Helms, Barbara;
Saints, Sufi
ISLAM
Helms, Barbara;
Druze
ISLAM
Khaizran, Yusri;
Sufism
ISLAM
Khan, Shahida: National Institute
Ideal Woman
ISLAM
Lob, Elisabetta;
Education
ISLAM
Olomi, Ali;
Islam in the Middle East
ISLAM
Rahman, Farhana;
Polygamy
ISLAM
Rahman, Farhana;
Prophets Wives
ISLAM
Rahman, Farhana;
Purdah
ISLAM
Rahman, Farhana;
Qur'an and Hadith
ISLAM
Rahman, Farhana;
Feminism
ISLAM
Rannveig Jetne Haga;
Coverings
ISLAM
Tayyen, Sana;

Hagar
ISLAM
Tayyen, Sana;
Marriage and Divorce
ISLAM
Tayyen, Sana;
Pilgrimage
ISLAM
Tayyen, Sana;
Reform
ISLAM
Tayyen, Sana;
Shari'a
ISLAM
Tayyen, Sana;
Women's Organizations
ISLAM
Tayyen, Sana;
Female Genital Mutilation
ISLAM
Team, Victoria;
Islam in Europe
ISLAM
Teodorescu, Adriana;
Diaspora
ISLAM
Valentina Fedele;
Fatima
ISLAM
Valentina Fedele;
Jina
JAINISM
Clines, Gregory;
Monastics and Nuns
JAINISM
Clines, Gregory;
Lay Women
JAINISM
de Gaia, Susan;
Female Deities
JAINISM
Mitra, Semontee;
Ritual
JAINISM
Mukherjee, Asha;
Bat Mitzvah
JUDAISM
Adelman, Penina;
Ancient Judaism
JUDAISM
Atkinson, Kenneth: Univ of Nort
Salome Alexandra
JUDAISM
Atkinson, Kenneth;
Shabbat
JUDAISM
Balogh, Amy;
Feminist and Women's Movements
JUDAISM
Beitler, Ruth: U.S. Military Acade
Israel
JUDAISM
Beitler, Ruth: U.S. Military Acade
Marriage and Divorce
JUDAISM
Beitler, Ruth: U.S. Military Acade
Rosh Hodesh
JUDAISM
Berrin, Susan;
American Denominations 1850 to Present
JUDAISM
Breitzer, Susan Roth: susan.breit
Judaism in America
JUDAISM
Breitzer, Susan Roth: susan.breit
Women and Work
JUDAISM
Breitzer, Susan Roth: susan.breit
Modern and Contemporary Judaism
JUDAISM
Breitzer, Susan;
Festivals and Holy Days
JUDAISM
Fadden, John;
Hebrew Bible
JUDAISM
Fadden, John;
Rabbis
JUDAISM
Fadden, John;
Mitzvah
JUDAISM
Goldhaber-Gordon, Ilana;
Lilith
JUDAISM
Grenn, D'vorah: The Lilith Institu
Priestesses
JUDAISM
Grenn, Dvorah;
Goddesses
JUDAISM
Hammer, Jill;
Synagogue
JUDAISM
Mayne, Hannah;
Peacemaking
JUDAISM
Messina, Adele;
Performance
JUDAISM
Pascal, Julia;
Judaism in Europe
JUDAISM
Roos, Lena: Uppsala University;
Sephardic and Mizrachi Judaisms
JUDAISM
Roos, Lena: Uppsala University;
Education
JUDAISM
Roos, Lena;
Food
JUDAISM
Roos, Lena;
Sex and Gender
JUDAISM
Roos, Lena;
Shabbat
JUDAISM
Sachs, Hannah;
Holocaust
JUDAISM
Saidel, Rochelle;
Midrash
JUDAISM
Sasso, Sandy;
Hasidism
JUDAISM
Shipley, Morgan;
Kabbalah
JUDAISM
Shipley, Morgan;